Why Zimbabwe is Back and Amazon in Style

in Amazon

12 years ago, when I first joined Steppes Travel,  Zimbabwe was our biggest selling safari destination. After spending a decade off the tourist map, Zimbabwe is slowly making a comeback as the political situation improves.

I have recently returned from trip to Zimbabwe, which has reminded me how remarkably diverse and easily explored the country is. Many of Zimbabwe's highlights are often not more than a couple of hours drive from another, making it both a self drive and guided touring destination.

Victoria Falls, with the iconic Victoria Falls Hotel, has always been the centrepiece of the Zimbabwean tourism industry and it provides an ideal springboard to explore other parts of the country, including Hwange National Park, famous for its elephant herds and lion prides, and the expansive Lake Kariba.

Further afield lies Mana Pools, on the Lower Zambezi, renowned for canoe trails, Bulawayo (Zimbabwe's second city) and the Matobo Hills, the Great Zimbabwe Ruins and the remarkable Eastern Highlands, with deeply forested and mountainous scenery.

The accommodation is also certainly worth a mention.  As I travelled to various regions, the service, food and hospitality remained outstanding.  The Victoria Falls hotel, is aptly named, of all the hotels in the area this has the best views of the falls. Davison's camp, Makalolo and Little Makalolo are all in Hwange and have exceptional game viewing - I counted 70 elephants on one safari. In Mana, the Ruckomechi Camp is superb for canoeing, fishing or boat trips and Singita Pamushana in Malingwe is luxury at its finest.

10 reasons to go to Zimbabwe:

  • Incredibly friendly, positive & intelligent people
  • Great service
  • The best trained guides in Africa
  • Fabulous game viewing
  • Exceptional accommodation
  • Delicious food
  • Unspoilt scenery
  • Very few tourists
  • 2/3's of the price of neighbouring countries
  • Safe - Foreign office advice is fine

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All the 5* comforts you wouldn't usually expect in the heart of the jungle

I am sure most passengers thinking of travelling deep into the Amazon are expecting the voyages to be a little "rough around the edges" – well think again. We are now offering 3 vessels that will take you into the Pacaya Samiria Reserve located deep within the Amazon rainforest at the headwaters of the Amazon River basin. This region is one of Peru's most well preserved havens for Amazon wildlife, plants and birds. The Amazon Basin contains a third of all animal species and one in five of all bird species; from the tiniest hummingbirds through to the great caracaras.

Spend your days exploring the region with excursions by comfortable motorised skiffs, visit communities who are an integral part of the reserve and learn about their ancestral traditions.
Exploring some of the smaller rivers such as the Pucate, Yanayacu and Dorado you will hopefully encounter both pink and grey river dolphin, giant otters, a plethora of birdlife, sloths and monkeys. You will have chance to paddle through blackwater lagoons, walk in regions of terra firma and possibly fish for piranhas. As night falls, you will hear the cacophony of the Amazon rainforest as the nocturnal wildlife comes alive.

Returning from your excursions to a your small luxury vessel to relax in large air-conditioned suites. Watch the Amazon slip by from magnificent panoramic windows, while you are served gourmet meals. Chill out with a book on one of the comfortable observation decks, or slip into the Jacuzzi.

If this sounds like your ideal cruise contact the voyages team on 01285 880981 or go to our Amazon Cruises page

 

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Steppes Travel has 1 articles online

Steppes Travel specialise in holidays to Peru, China holidays and South Africa safari.

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Why Zimbabwe is Back and Amazon in Style

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This article was published on 2010/11/20